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Potassium Channels

Receptors are found on the surface of cells and have numerous functions. They act as binding sites or antigens to antibodies and other ligands and can communicate signals within a cell or between cells and even allow for transport of molecules into and out of the cell. Receptors are made of proteins and act as ligands to other proteins, molecules, drugs or toxins. Basically, the ligand will bind to the receptor and form a ligand-receptor complex. Certain ligands can activate a receptor. These are called agonists. Other ligands will deactivate or block the receptor from having a certain action. These are called antagonists. Antibodies can serve as binding materials and can also be agonists or antagonists. Receptor structure varies depending on the classification of the certain receptor. There are receptors that merely sit on the surface of cells and receptors that go across the external cellular membrane. These include G-protein coupled receptors and ligand- gated ion channels. Potassium channels are also highly specialized membrane proteins which allow potassium ions to enter the cell under circumstances. The potassium channels have a tetrameric structure of four identical subunits. These ion channels can be either voltage gated or ligand gated. The state of the potassium channel is either opened (activated) or closed (deactivated or inactivated). When the channel is open, the potassium ions can flow freely across the membrane. Voltage activated channels are activated by a change in the membrane potential and ligand activated channels are triggered by the binding of a ligand to the protein's receptor site. Blockers exist, such as 4-aminopyridine and 3,4-diaminopridine, which block the activity of potassium channels and have shown potential in treatment of disorders like multiple sclerosis. Potassium channel antibodies also bind against potassium channels and affect or block their activity.

Anti-kir6.2 antibody binds against the inwardly rectifying potassium channel 11 from subfamily J. This potassium channel is ATP sensitive and is found in endocrine cells, neurons, and muscle cells. Kir6.2 plays an integral role in controlling insulin secretion and muscle tone. The inward rectifier potassium channels have a greater tendency to allow the potassium ion to flow into a cell rather than out of the cell. Defects in these channels are associated with hyperinsulinemic hypoglycemia, neonatal diabetes, and type 2 diabetes. Hyperinsulinemic hypoglycemia is a form of low blood sugar caused by excessive einsulin. Neonatal diabetes is a form of insulin sensitive hyperglycemia diagnosed within the first couple months of life. This form of diabetes can be temporary or permanent. Type 2 diabetes is a form of diabetes mellitus that occurs in overweight adults who have a resistance to insulin. Anti-GIRK 2 antibody binds against the target G protein activated inward rectifier potassium channel 2. GIRK 2 is localized on the cell membrane and most found in the cerebellum and pancreas. GIRK 2 is a potassium channel that is involved in the regulation of insulin secretion.

 
Product Number Title Applications Host Clonality
AC21-2635 Anti-ABCC9 Antibody ELISA Goat Polyclonal
AC21-0987-01 Anti-KCNC3 Antibody (AMCA) ELISA, WB Goat Polyclonal
AC21-0987-02 Anti-KCNC3 Antibody (AP) ELISA, WB Goat Polyclonal
AC21-0987-03 Anti-KCNC3 Antibody (APC) ELISA, WB Goat Polyclonal
AC21-0987-04 Anti-KCNC3 Antibody (APC-Cy5.5) ELISA, WB Goat Polyclonal
AC21-0987-05 Anti-KCNC3 Antibody (APC-Cy7) ELISA, WB Goat Polyclonal
AC21-0987-06 Anti-KCNC3 Antibody (Avidin) ELISA, WB Goat Polyclonal
AC21-0987-07 Anti-KCNC3 Antibody (Biotin) ELISA, WB Goat Polyclonal
AC21-0987-08 Anti-KCNC3 Antibody (BPE) ELISA, WB Goat Polyclonal
AC21-0987-09 Anti-KCNC3 Antibody (Cy3) ELISA, WB Goat Polyclonal
AC21-0987-10 Anti-KCNC3 Antibody (Cy5) ELISA, WB Goat Polyclonal
AC21-0987-11 Anti-KCNC3 Antibody (Cy5.5) ELISA, WB Goat Polyclonal