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Neuronal Disease Antibodies

The nervous system is an intricate, highly developed system that regulates and synchronizes the body’s activities. The nervous system is an organ system which contains a grid of specialized neuronal cells called neurons. The human nervous system consists of two major parts called the central nervous system and the peripheral nervous system. The central nervous system in vertebrates contains the brain, spinal cord, and eyes. The peripheral nervous system contains sensory neurons which connect peripheral body parts to each other and to the central nervous system. Neurons, whether in the peripheral or central nervous system, function by transmitting chemical and/or electrical signals between each other, typically across a space called a synapse. Chemical messengers involved in the signal transmission between neurons are called neurotransmitters. Disorders of the nervous system, or neuronal diseases, can be caused by many different mechanisms. The nervous system is vulnerable to trauma, infections, degenerations, structural defects, tumors, blood flow disruption, and autoimmune disorders. Vascular neuronal disorders include stroke, hemorrhage in the subarachnoid space, subdural hemorrhage, extradural hemorrhage, and hematoma. Infections of the nervous system include meningitis, encephalitis, polio and epidural abscess. Structural disorders can often plague the nervous system which can include brain or spinal cord injuries, carpal tunnel syndrome, or defects in genes coding for the proteins which make up the structures of the central and peripheral nervous system. Headache, epilepsy, dizziness, and neuralgia are examples of functional neuronal diseases. Also, because the amount of nerve cells a person is born with stays stable throughout their lives (for the most part, brain cells and other peripheral neurons are not regenerated or created later in life), neural degeneration like Parkinson’s disease, multiple sclerosis, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, Huntington’s disease, and Alzheimer’s are common types of neuronal disease or dysfunction.

The anti- neuroserpin antibody has roles in serine protease inhibitors. It may be involved in the protein that reorganizes synaptic connections and protects neurons from cell damage. Defects in neuroserpin cause genetic encephalopathy characterized by inherited dementia. The notch 2 protein is a receptor on the membrane of cells and binds to ligands and anti- notch 2 antibodies. These proteins regulate the fate of the cell by influencing processes including differentiation, proliferation, and apoptosis specifically of osteoclasts or bone cells. Defects in NOTCH2 cause Alagille syndrome type 2 and Hajdu-Cheney syndrome (HJCYS). HJCYS is a skeletal disorder. Hajdu-Cheney syndrome affected individuals have facial defects, osteoporosis, acro-osteolysis, and periodontal disease. Alagille syndrome type 2 is a form of arteriohepatic dysplasia which involves multisystem defects characterized by chronic cholestasis due to paucity of intrahepatic bile ducts, peripheral pulmonary artery stenosis, and dysplastic kidneys. Alagille syndrome type 2 is inherited by an autosomal dominant fashion.

 
Product Number Title Applications Host Clonality
AC21-2631 Anti-TRIM11 Antibody ELISA, WB Goat Polyclonal
AC21-2640 Anti-Granulin Antibody ELISA, WB Goat Polyclonal
AC21-2723 Anti-Caspase 12 Antibody ELISA, WB Goat Polyclonal
AC21-2736 Anti-Alpha Synuclein Antibody ELISA, WB Goat Polyclonal
AC21-2737 Anti-Alpha Synuclein Antibody ELISA, WB Goat Polyclonal
AC21-0028-01 Anti-SorLA Antibody (AMCA) ELISA, WB Goat Polyclonal
AC21-0028-02 Anti-SorLA Antibody (AP) ELISA, WB Goat Polyclonal
AC21-0028-03 Anti-SorLA Antibody (APC) ELISA, WB Goat Polyclonal
AC21-0028-04 Anti-SorLA Antibody (APC-Cy5.5) ELISA, WB Goat Polyclonal
AC21-0028-05 Anti-SorLA Antibody (APC-Cy7) ELISA, WB Goat Polyclonal
AC21-0028-06 Anti-SorLA Antibody (Avidin) ELISA, WB Goat Polyclonal
AC21-0028-07 Anti-SorLA Antibody (Biotin) ELISA, WB Goat Polyclonal