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Fatty Acids

Fatty acids are large molecules containing a carboxylic acid molecule connected to a carbon/hydrogen chain or tail. There are two main types of fatty acids, and they are characterized as either cis or trans and unsaturated or saturated. Unsaturated fats contain at least one alkene, or double bonded carbon in its carbon/hydrogen tail. Saturated fats do not contain any double bonds. Cis and trans refer to the isomer of the alkene bonds in the hydrocarbon chain of unsaturated fatty acids. Essentially, cis and trans isomers have the same composition but a different arrangement. The arrangement of the cis isomer looks like a bowl or a table with the double bond between the carbons being either the bottom of the bowl or the top of the table and the single bonds to the next carbons forming the sides of the bowl or the table legs. The arrangement of the trans isomer looks more like stairs with the double bond between carbons forming one step with neighboring bonds to neighboring carbons forming one ramp up from and one ramp down from the landing of the “step”. Technically, unsaturated fatty acid chains where all double bonds are in the trans formation are monounsaturated or polyunsaturated. However, because of the trans isomer(s) in the double bonded alkenes, the entire molecule appears as a straight molecule with no kinks or bends and acts more like a saturated fat. Fatty acids are one of the available sources of energy for organisms. Fat is metabolized into energy (ATP) and is a fairly concentrated form of calories and energy as opposed to carbohydrates and proteins. Fatty acids are also a very important structural component of membranes in the body.

Anti-CPT1A antibody binds against the target carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1. CPT1A is a protein localized on the outer membrane of the mitochondria and expressed in the kidney, heart, liver, and skeletal muscle. Defects in CPT1A are the cause of carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1A deficiency. Carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1A deficiency is a disorder of long-chain fatty acid oxidation characterized by rapid onset gastrointestinal illness that can occur when the body’s need for energy increases. Affected individuals can have extreme hypoglycemia which can be treated with prompt treatment with intravenous dextrose sugar. Anti-CPT2 antibody binds against the target carnitine O palmitoyltransferase 2. CPT2 is localized on the inner membrane of the mitochondria and is involved in lipid metabolism and fatty acid beta-oxidation. Defects in CPT2 are the cause of carnitine palmitoyltransferase 2 deficiency.

 
Product Number Title Applications Host Clonality
AC21-2669 Anti-ABCD2 Antibody ELISA, WB Goat Polyclonal
AC21-2824 Anti-ACADVL Antibody ELISA, WB Goat Polyclonal
AC21-2830 Anti-Niemann Pick C1 Antibody ELISA, WB Goat Polyclonal
AC21-2845 Anti-CROT Antibody ELISA, WB Goat Polyclonal
AC21-2855 Anti-DGAT1 Antibody ELISA, WB Goat Polyclonal
AC21-2934 Anti-Cardiac FABP Antibody ELISA, WB Goat Polyclonal
AC21-2936 Anti-FABP4 Antibody ELISA, WB Goat Polyclonal
AC21-0204-01 Anti-CPT1B Antibody (AMCA) ELISA, IHC Goat Polyclonal
AC21-0204-02 Anti-CPT1B Antibody (AP) ELISA, IHC Goat Polyclonal
AC21-0204-03 Anti-CPT1B Antibody (APC) ELISA, IHC Goat Polyclonal
AC21-0204-04 Anti-CPT1B Antibody (APC-Cy5.5) ELISA, IHC Goat Polyclonal
AC21-0204-05 Anti-CPT1B Antibody (APC-Cy7) ELISA, IHC Goat Polyclonal