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DNA Methylation

DNA methylation is the addition of a methyl (CH3) group to a cytosine base residue in DNA. This process occurs during normal development and cellular differentiation. This process is carried out by enzymes called DNA methyltransferases (in mammals) and typically leads to the suppression of the gene to which the methyl group has been added. By this mechanism, DMA methylation is one of the methods that can be used to regulate the expression of genes. DNA methylation itself can be inherited through cell division. It serves many important functions including cellular direction and memory, suppressing viral genes that may have been inserted into the genome, and chromatin structure. The key enzyme involved in the process of DNA methylation is DNA methyltransferase. DNA methyltransferases are a group of enzymes that catalyze the transfer of the methyl group to DNA in mammals. They essentially harvest a methyl group from S-adenosyl methionine molecules.

Anti-PRDM9 antibody binds against the target PRDM9. PRDM9 is a methyltransferase that trimethylates certain histones during the meiotic phase of cell division. PRDM9 is localized in the nucleus of the cell, specifically in the chromosomes. Anti-tet2 antibody binds against the target tet2. Tet2 is expressed in high amounts in hematopoietic cells but is also broadly expressed throughout the body. TET2 catalyzes the conversion of methylcytosine to 5-hydroxymethylcytosine. Defects in TET2 are implicated in myeloproliferative disorders, polycythemia vera, systemic mastocytosis, and myelodysplastic syndromes. Myeloproliferative diseases ir MPDs are a group of diseases of bone marrow that causes extra cells to be produced. Polycythemia vera is a bone marrow disease characterized by too much production of red blood cells and platelets. Systemic mastocytosis is a disorder where mast cells are increased in multiple organ systems. Since mast cells are immune cells that assist in the body's allergic responses, symptoms include anaphylaxis, hives, and itching. Myelodysplastic syndromes are preleukemia syndromes that involve ineffective production of myeloid blood cells.

 
Product Number Title Applications Host Clonality
AC16-0043 Anti-5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5-hmC) Antibody WB, IHC(F), IHC(P) Mouse Monoclonal (4D9)
AC16-0073 Anti-5-methylcytosine (5-mC) Antibody WB Mouse Monoclonal (33D3)
AC16-0043-01 Anti-5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5-hmC) Antibody (AMCA) WB, IHC(F), IHC(P) Mouse Monoclonal (4D9)
AC16-0043-02 Anti-5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5-hmC) Antibody (AP) WB, IHC(F), IHC(P) Mouse Monoclonal (4D9)
AC16-0043-03 Anti-5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5-hmC) Antibody (APC) WB, IHC(F), IHC(P) Mouse Monoclonal (4D9)
AC16-0043-04 Anti-5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5-hmC) Antibody (APC-Cy5.5) WB, IHC(F), IHC(P) Mouse Monoclonal (4D9)
AC16-0043-05 Anti-5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5-hmC) Antibody (APC-Cy7) WB, IHC(F), IHC(P) Mouse Monoclonal (4D9)
AC16-0043-06 Anti-5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5-hmC) Antibody (Avidin) WB, IHC(F), IHC(P) Mouse Monoclonal (4D9)
AC16-0043-07 Anti-5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5-hmC) Antibody (Biotin) WB, IHC(F), IHC(P) Mouse Monoclonal (4D9)
AC16-0043-08 Anti-5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5-hmC) Antibody (BPE) WB, IHC(F), IHC(P) Mouse Monoclonal (4D9)
AC16-0043-09 Anti-5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5-hmC) Antibody (Cy3) WB, IHC(F), IHC(P) Mouse Monoclonal (4D9)
AC16-0043-10 Anti-5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5-hmC) Antibody (Cy5) WB, IHC(F), IHC(P) Mouse Monoclonal (4D9)